News

From: Dayton Media <[email protected]>
Date: June 27, 2018 at 9:51:12 AM CDT
To: Dayton Media <[email protected]>
Subject: RELEASE: Statement from Governor Dayton on the US Supreme Court’s Ruling in Janus v. AFSCME

Seal State of Minnesota


OFFICE OF GOVERNOR MARK DAYTON

 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 27, 2018
 
Contact: Matt Swenson
651-201-34
41 office
[email protected]
 
Statement from Governor Dayton on the US Supreme Court’s Ruling in Janus v. AFSCME
 
ST. PAUL, MN – Today, Governor Mark Dayton issued the following statement regarding the United States Supreme Court’s decision in Janus v. AFSCME.
 
“The US Supreme Court’s decision today in the case of Janus v. AFSCME is appalling. Its determination that fair share union fees somehow violate the US Constitution is just the kind of terrible ‘Judicial Activism,’ which some Justices profess to deplore.
 
"The benefits provided by a union to employees who elect not to join it are enormous. They receive the same better wages, safer working conditions, and stronger job protections as do union members. It is only fair that they should share in paying for the benefits that they receive."
 
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Office of Governor Mark Dayton, Communications Department
130 State Capitol, 75 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., St. Paul, MN 55155 

T: 651-201-3400 | [email protected]
As New York City became the epicenter of the global coronavirus pandemic, emergency medical services (EMS) professionals, including 

During Law Enforcement Week, we honor public safety officers who paid the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty.

Roxie Nelson remembers her father, Ed Nelson, as a caring and passionate man who often put the needs of others before his own.

Our AFSCME winter celebration event will be held on Wednesday, December 19th, noon, at South Central College in North Mankato.  As in the past, we will be having door prize drawings for our members.  If you have a talent that you would like to showcase, we would greatly appreciate hand-crafted items that you would donate.  If you are not crafty but have new items that you are not going to use and would like to “re-home” them, we are interested in those too.

Editor’s note: The following is a story from the front lines of the fight against COVID-19, as told by a member in Washington state:

“My name is Kristina Johnson-Short and I am a social services specialist with the Division of Children, Youth and Families in Washington state. I’m a proud AFSCME member, a shop steward and president of AFSCME Local 1054 (WFSE). I am also a domestic violence survivor.

It’s become clear that relief bills Congress has approved thus far, including the record $2.2 trillion Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act, won’t be enough to quell the health and economic fallout caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

What other aid should Congress provide? AFSCME has recommendations.

AFSCME members working for the Louisiana Workforce Commission (LWC) are hopping busy these days fulfilling a critical mission. They are helping Louisianans survive as the Bayou State’s economy buckles under pressure from the coronavirus pandemic.

Updating wills before heading into work. Extending the lives of single-use masks. Self-isolating from their own families. These are just some of the shameful realities and conditions health care workers on the front lines of fighting the COVID-19 pandemic are facing each day.

Before the announcement early Wednesday of an unprecedented $2 trillion deal to combat the coronavirus pandemic, AFSCME President Lee Saunders and three front-line workers put pressure on federal lawmakers to come through with a robust aid package for state and local governments so they can rebuild decimated public services.

The coronavirus aid package that cleared Congress is just not good enough for public service workers. That’s the takeaway message from AFSCME President Lee Saunders.

As the coronavirus (COVID-19) emerges in the United States, many AFSCME members are and will continue to be on the front lines caring for and transporting those afflicted with the virus. Workers in emergency services, health care, child care, educational institutions and many others may come in contact with people who’ve contracted the coronavirus, putting themselves at risk.